About your Search

20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the last four years, during the daunting challenges of the worse in iraq and afghanistan have been truly remarkable and the nation owes him our deepest gratitude. it is appropriate at today's hearing also to note the passing last week of former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, retired arm general john shalikashivili. his personal story is well known, rising from post-world war ii immigrant youth to chairman of the joint chiefs. his example of patriotism, leadership and selfless service to the nation and our armed forces inspired the generation that leads our military today. for those of us who knew him, we treasured his professionalism, his candor, and his deep love for america and our men and women in uniform. general denver mpsey's confirma will help the transition to president obama's new security team which have seen significant changes in the last few months. the next chairman will face demanding challenges, operations in afghanistan and iraq continue to at the same time the fiscal realities that confront the nation will put tremendous pressures on the defense department's bud
at the post in washington and abroad. and she has covered pakistan and afghanistan extensively, so we are really lucky to have both of them tonight. after the ambassadors opening remarks, he and karen will have a conversation before opening it up to q&a with the audience. so please join me in welcoming ambassador haqqani and karen de young. [applause] >> thank you very much patricia for that kind introduction. of course when i was asked to come here i talked and nobody is paying any attention to pakistan these days. nothing gets said about pakistan in the media so why not use this forum to be able to communicate, and of course find an excuse to be on c-span. [laughter] and so therefore, here i am. it is a pleasure to see secretary mikhail in the audience, judith mchale and i have worked together in the last, since her appointment as undersecretary and public diplomacy of course is one of the many challenges we have dealt with on our and so it is a pleasure seeing you here in thank you for all the help and cooperation that you offer here. and to the distinguished audience many of whom
represented inside the halls corridor of power. afghanistan, you know, if we listened to president obama during the campaign, and i was one who said that,ing you know, progressives need to be tough and pragmatic about president obama as he is about us, he spoke about afghanistan as the good war, and he did that because he needed to show because of the national security state grip on our politics, until we find a way to end that, a president remains captive to a large extent. he had to show he was tough. i think now what's going on in this country is you have the ability, polls are snapshots, but on a number of core issues, afghanistan, corporate powers and others, there's majorities of people who want a way out of afghanistan, who believe corporate power is too strong in this country, and a president with leadership could seize that. it's not too late, and find a way to build politics around that. thinking of president johnson, wars kill, reform presidencies. president obama is a reform, maybe deluded, too limited, but in these areas, a reform president. it's imperative now for citizens,
recommend to you relative to the issue of contracting in afghanistan a report, which was a major report of this committee in october of 2010 entitled inquiry into the role and oversight of private security contractors in afghanistan. it was a long investigation, a detailed investigation, a very disturbing investigation about the shortfalls of our private security contractors and the regulations and the policies needed to governor their operations. so the article we saw in the paper the other day about some of the funds ending up in the hands of our enemy. was based on that investigation made references, as a matter of fact, to the investigation. but in terms of trying to put an end to some of the ways it is going on relative to contractors in afghanistan, i would recommend that very detailed report that we all worked so hard on. and i was intrigued by your comment about how much personal pleasure you take from not being a lawyer, but i will not pursue that, being a lawyer. and since i'm interested in your rapid confirmation -- and unless there are any additional questions from senator p
is hard-core. back i will go to afghanistan and in bed himself while i'm embedded in vegas. he's in afghanistan. good for him. who else? i read it all. everything i can get my hands on. i loved the hunger games trilogy which is on. it was really good. >> do you see yourself, are you more accountable now with screenwriters as opposed to other authors? what is your community? >> i have a lot of writing france, but overall i don't know that many screenwriters because i don't live in l.a. i don't have a lot of close friends who are writers but i have a couple, matthew pearl is a good friend of mine in austin. joe fender has a book out. a wonderful book on he is great. a few other local writers. i don't, you know, we don't sit around and turtlenecks and drink coffee. it's not that scene. [laughter] >> would've turned to come upon the time, as we say then we'll be doing a book signing after this and there are other events obviously with late nights at the da. i would ask you a couple more questions to rout out and we would like the audience, if you have a question to please come on d
, you know, i read sebastian younger. he will go to afghanistan and embed himself. while i'm embedded in vegas, he's in afghanistan. good for him. what else? i read it all that comes out. everything. i love "the hunger games." which is odd. it was really good. >> right. do you see yourself more comfortable now as opposed to other authors? >> my friends aren't -- i have a lot of writing friends. overall, you know, i don't know that many screen writers. i don't live in l.a. were they are all there. yeah, you know, i -- i don't have a lot of close friends who are writers. i have a couple. guy named matthew pearl, he's a good friend of mine. a guy named joe who has a book out. wonderful gook. he's great. a few other local writers. but yeah, there's not -- you know, i don't -- you know, we don't sit around in turtle necks and drink coffee. not that speed. yeah. but -- yeah. >> we're starting to come up on the time. as we say, ben is going to be doing a book signing after this. there are other events, obviously with late nights. i want to ask you just a couple more questions. what we would
. ou guest: >>t guest: well, one of thef emerging threat hubs.li it may become afghanistan on c steroids. theis nearly a failed state right now. the president was seriously injured in a mortar attack by the opposition.ion. this is only a unified country over the past 20 years.rsome ar has a history of breaking apart, if you will. what we have seen in the last 45 months is that al qaeda and anher extremists have been a will to develop a firmer hold of a southern part of the country.l that is important. i wish we had a map. fir you can see the proximity.on already a failed state. we also have a big hub.soma it is pretty well understood a that we are starting to see a migration. whenever words you want to use. the reason that happens is theym understand that with the power vacuum there is opportunity for them. the great thing about a failed state is that it is hard to operate.s no it is a little bit of a double-edged sword. i believe that human is at the center. this one final point. the, the central figures, is really unlike any other that we see.e ader e call it the trifecta. the
hunted down, you have native indians in brazil. even in afghanistan they call the areas where they're doing all the bombing the tribal areas. i want you to speak to the fact that indigenous people around the world are being if under attack. er attack. and is there some way we can get this out into the press so they can understand that this should be stopped immediately? >> guest: well, what you're saying was true. >> guest: what you are saying is true. i was just in norway and the performance with a nsga woman in india under attack by the burmese. i think what it is, there's always the land hunger and indigenous people are vulnerable. there are resources that others want. for instance, in i think it is coaster rica, covered the land and animals and oil. so what we think about is the oil in the gulf. we don't realize that is happening in other regions as well. it should be published. it should be in papers. it is very difficult to have that information. one book that i read was by hawkins. i am sure you remember him from long ago. or maybe not. the same thing is going on -- in a way
sebastian yonder is a phenomenal reuter and he will go to afghanistan and so good for him. i read it all. i love the hundred games trilogy which is odd that i would like that but it's really good. >> are you more comfortable now with screenwriters as opposed to other authors? >> my friends -- i have a lot of writing friends but overall, i don't know of that many because i don't live in l.a. and they are all there. but yeah, i don't have a lot of close friends who are writers, i have a couple, matthew pearl who rode the dante club. a wonderful book come he is great. a few other local writers, but you know, i don't -- we don't sit around and drink coffee in turtlenecks. [laughter] but yeah. >> we are starting to come up on the time. he will be doing a book signing immediately after and there's other evens obviously with late nights at dhaka dma. what we would really like the audience to do is if you have a question please come down to one of the standing microphones at the front and we will take you in order for 15 minutes or so and then wrap up the evening at that point. if you have some que
'm not a warmonger i don't want another war. we are already tied up in iraq, afghanistan and for some reason libya. but the only way to stop iran is with clear military force. sanctions are great but at the end of the day they are not going to work. at the end of the day iranian regime is motivated by, again, an ideology. it's a messianic ideology. they truly believe and they will shape policy around this, the iranian government truly believe that they can punish in the end times. >> host: this would be the 12th? >> guest: that goes by various names. he is the islamist must live. this all sounds crazy i know but they really believe this. the likes of ahmadinejad. they believe that if they strike out against israel, if they acquire nuclear weapons, if there's a ton of great global chaos and a people which are seeing right now with this arab spring, they believe that can hasten the return of the islamist messiah who believed lead them to victory over israel and the west. so acquiring nuclear weapons is part of that divine plan. nothing will deter them or dissuade them from this goal. they believe it
to go to for jihadists and afghanistan, iran, excuse me, afghanistan, iraq, pakistan or yemen but as many as two dozen muslim americans and al-shabaab with many cases trained by al qaeda leaders remain unaccounted for. the committee has found that all chabad related federal prosecutions for funding, recruiting and attempting to join al-shabaab are the largest number and most significant upward trend in the terror cases filed for the justice department over the past two years. least 38 cases have been unsealed since 2009. minnesota, ohio, california, new jersey, new york, illinois, alabama, virginia and texas three al-shabaab is recruiting inside american mosques and disalle communities like minneapolis and san diego. according to the justice department. this month and also of recruiter pleaded guilty to a recording a large group of muslims from minneapolis at mosques and without any known protest moscow's leaders. a top also leader in somalia supervised this recruiting. one minnesota recruited was a suicide bomber whose 2008 attack on northern somalia send shock waves of alarm
down more or less, and native indians in brazil, even in afghanistan, they call the areas where they are doing all the bombing, they are tribal areas, and i wondered if you could just speak to the fact that indigenous people all over the world are under attack, and is there some way that we can get this out into the press so understand that this should be stopped immediately. >> guest: well, what you're saying is true. i was just in norway, and i did a performance with asami person and a woman from india. she's a naga, that's the name of their indigenous nation under attack by the burmese, and i think what it is is there's always the land hunger, the need -- taking over for land, and the indoing nows people are -- indigenous people are vulnerable because they're in isolated areas or places they were sent that suddenly have resources available that others want. for instance, chevron has in, i think, it's costa rica has just covered the people, the land, the water, and the animals in oil so what we think about is the oil in the gulf, but we don't realize that that's happening in o
. even in afghanistan, they call the areas where they're doing all the bombing the tribal areas. and i was wondering if you could just speak to the fact that indigenous people all over the world are under attack. and is there some way we can get this out into the press so they can understand that this should be stopped immediately? >> guest: well, what you're saying was true. i was just in norway and did a performance with a sammi person and a notga woman in india who were under attack by the burmese. and what i think it is there's always the land hunger, the taking over for land. and the indigenous people are vulnerable because they're in isolated areas or they're in places that they were sent that suddenly have resources available that others want, for instance, chevron, you know, has been -- i think it's costa rica has just covered the people of the land, the water and all the animals in oil. and so we think about -- what we think about the oil in the gulf but we don't realize that's happening in our regions as well. so it should be published. it should be in papers. and it's very d
american problem. we are not talking about the war in afghanistan or raising the debt ceiling i grant that. but we are talking about something which is profoundly troubling and disturbing to millions of americans and it is also on necessary. i thought what we were meant to do is try to clear up problems here, and ten years ago they came to us and said we will clear of the problems because they make us look bad if we don't and therefore you could trust us to do it and they did so all i'm saying is we are going to stick with this. the sec stated yesterday it is seeking comment on whether a band third party billing appreciate that and they settle things, the have settlements and the ftc and that is stuff that is already done and is the mission of guilt. general madigan i want you to know that that's the way i read at the rate in the near future i plan to introduce working with colleagues on both sides of the aisle. the legislation that would put a stop to this because i simply cannot find any grain of sense to us having to have a hearing like this and have -- i'm sorry you haven't got any eno
be captured outside of afghanistan. as director of nctc, you will be integrally involved in deliberations relative to any proposal for a long-term plan on detention and interrogation and my question to you is, are you prepared to give sound advice, number one, that you are going to be asked to give and secondly, if the administration appears to be headed down a road that you don't think is the right direction to go, will you say to this committee now that you are going to express yourself in a very strong manner to help to try to develop the best possible policy for detention and interrogation of high-value targets even though your opinion may be contrary to the folks at the white house who are nominating you today? >> yes, absolutely and if i may, i do make that pledge. i think in my prior position, i had taken a position. in other words i have given advice in an unvarnished, objective independent way as a career government official. i've made known my personal views and sought to move positions based on my objective and independent and nonpolitical perspective. i do think that these que
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)